How to stop a Koch Industries takeover of Harvey’s Industrial Products

By Kevin Sieff/The Associated PressA federal appeals court has ruled that Harvey’s industrial plastics maker is the rightful owner of the Harvey’s logo.

In a decision released Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit said Harvey is the true owner of its iconic “Harvey” symbol.

Harvey is one of the most recognizable symbols of the Koch Industries company.

The company was founded in 1966 by brothers Charles and David Koch and has grown to become one of America’s most powerful business interests.

The brothers’ fortune has risen from a little more than $100 billion in 1976 to more than a billion today.

Harvester’s plastics is one product of their business, including other companies such as Teflon and PVC, which are also used to make plastic products.

The company says its logo and other trademarks are registered to the Harvey family, but it does not appear to have owned the logo since 1976.

Harveys logo was designed in 1964, when Harvey had just opened its first plant in Texas.

The firm’s logo was not adopted until the early 1980s, when the company started to make plastics.

The appeals court said the company’s trademark registration is valid as long as the company does not intend to use the logo.

It said the court should let Harvey’s trademark “resume validity and allow the corporation to continue to use Harvey’s name and the logo as a trademark” without any restrictions.

The court said a trademark registration should not be allowed in circumstances where it would prevent the plaintiff from using the logo in a manner that is not an infringement of the plaintiff’s trademark.

It also said the case should not involve whether the logo’s use is a trademark infringement.

The case is Harvey’s first of two pending at the 9:1 majority on the 9 th Circuit.

Harley is one-third owned by a Texas-based company called Harvey Glass, which has a long history of lawsuits over its use of the company name.

In 2016, the company settled with the U:S.

Justice Department and agreed to pay a $20 million penalty to settle charges that it illegally used the Harvey Glass name.